Linkety Links: Rape in Prisons, White Privilege and Feminists, Hotels, Pervs, and More!!

Its been awhile, friends and readers!! I’ve been bouncing around, adjusting to a summer job and detoxing my brain from school. But I haven’t stopped reading!! Here are some of the pieces that have caught my eye as of late. Happy perusing! <3 Why that Harvard/Tufts Study Isn’t Breaking News Racialicious: “Another week, another head-scratching study result. Or so you’d think, right? The study, conducted by researchers at … Continue reading Linkety Links: Rape in Prisons, White Privilege and Feminists, Hotels, Pervs, and More!!

When Anger Erupts: The Conundrum of Feminist Infighting

This post is cross-posted from The Canonball Blog as part of a series they have been running on Sister Outsider by Audre Lorde. Enjoy! – Katrina

“The personal is political”: we feminists love this statement, don’t we? Belief that one’s personal circumstances are what they are because of politics was the basis for a lot of consciousness raising and activism during the Second Wave, when this statement became popularized. I’ve been thinking about it the other way around though, recently. I think it is important to consider the implications here: the political is personal, too. And sometimes the people closest to the scene where the anger Audrey wrote about earlier this week gets ignited are people who, in most other situations, we would consider an ally. I’m thinking girl-on-girl and feminist-on-feminist political anger.

Of course, there is a lot of girl on girl anger out there in the world at large. There is a reason so many people have all seen the movie Mean Girls: it talks about something that is true to life and many of our school experiences. One of my best friends is writing a paper on female beefs in hip-hop culture (Lil’ Kim and Nicki Minaj, anyone?). Taylor Swift writes slut shaming lyrics. These kinds of conflicts aren’t unusual to us as female identified people, or to popular culture. So what happens when it touches down in our feminist back yard?

Continue reading “When Anger Erupts: The Conundrum of Feminist Infighting”

Some links!!: Mother’s Day stories, a sweet zine, and how to deal with anger

The U.S. Maternal Healthcare Crisis: 14 Numbers You Need to Know Science & Sensibility: “Mother’s Day is May 8. At Amnesty International USA, we’re honoring mothers by fighting for maternal health — sending Mother’s Day action cards to U.S. and international decision-makers, hosting events and more (sign up at amnestyusa.org/mothersday).  Amnesty is also launching a One-Year Update to our groundbreaking report, Deadly Delivery: The Maternal Health Care … Continue reading Some links!!: Mother’s Day stories, a sweet zine, and how to deal with anger

Happy Mother’s Day: On Choice and Childbirth in the U.S.

I’m writing this Mother’s Day post through a fog of a nasty sickness, so I can’t guarantee it will be as polished as I intend. My hope is that it will make a modicum of sense! I am here on this day to write about the issue of childbirth, choice, maternal healthcare and the violations that are rampant in the U.S. regarding all of these things. I want to open the conversation up about an aspect of women’s choice that I have not heard discussed even once in mainstream feminist circles: The choices that women should have to decide how and where they want to have their babies.

Yesterday, with my throat too sore and my brain to busy to sleep, but my body too sick and tired to do much of anything I came across the documentary “Pregnant in America: A Nation’s Miscarriage” on netflix, available for instant view. Despite the fact that the average childbearing age in the U.S. is 29.4 years old, and I am a mere 25 years old, I can think of a dozen women around my age who are my good friends who have kids (many of them have more than 1 by now) or are pregnant. And that is just off the top of my head! “Why the heck not, I thought. This will be illuminating if nothing else,” so I watched it. And mind = blown, a little bit.

Continue reading “Happy Mother’s Day: On Choice and Childbirth in the U.S.”

Remember Us in Tucson: The Battle Over Ethnic Studies in Arizona

photo courtesy AlterNet / Javier Gonzalez

A close friend and comrade of mine is an educator in Tucson, Arizona. As the battle over multiethnic education wages on, she repeatedly demands, “Remember us in Tucson!” It is imperative that we keep Arizona on our minds; these efforts against ethnic studies are wrapped up in the other major struggle of the southwest: immigration. SB1070, the staunchly anti-immigrant bill, recently reached its one year anniversary; Huffington Post reporter Victoria M. DeFrancesco Soto discusses its beginnings as a Tea Party stimulant and its recent defeat, due in part to the economic toll it has cost Arizonians already. DeFrancesco Soto also lists the anti-immigration bills that have been introduced to Arizona in 2011; she states, “The targeting of immigrants from 2010 grew into an assault on their sons and daughters.” To this end, the vehement effort to end ethnic studies comes as no surprise.

Continue reading “Remember Us in Tucson: The Battle Over Ethnic Studies in Arizona”

So Far This Week: Osama’s death, the GOP and rape/abortion, the history of rainbow pride, and more!

Hey hey hello there! I was trying to wait until the end of the week to post links, but all of a sudden this morning I already had so many. Here are some the news bits that have caught my eye so far this week. Enjoy! – Katrina In Search Of Meaning: Osama Bin Laden and the Dancing Americans Mondoweiss: “Those of us that know … Continue reading So Far This Week: Osama’s death, the GOP and rape/abortion, the history of rainbow pride, and more!

Introductions of the New R/V Staff!

Caroline Biggs is incoming Editor of Commissioning, Outreach and Publicity

Hello!!! I’m Caroline, a second-year Women’s History graduate student getting ready to take on my thesis work next year! Originally from Wichita, Kansas I went to the University of Kansas where I studied Sociology, Women’s Studies, and English Literature and fell in love with feminist theory and activism. After graduating, I moved to Chicago where I ran a women’s clothing boutique in Wicker Park for two years before deciding it was time to return to academia. At SLC, my areas of study have focused on the impact of fashion in the continuum of the Women’s Movement, particularly the feminist resistance against Christian Dior’s New Look in 1947 at the war’s end.

Continue reading “Introductions of the New R/V Staff!”

Women’s History Has Many Points of View

By Lizzy Shramko

This interview was originally posted on Elevate Difference.

Attribution: Nydia Swaby

With the question “who gets to write history?” at its center, RE/VISIONIST is an online publication started by a handful of graduate students at Sarah Lawrence College who study women’s history. Many historians push to catalog the discipline of history as a pure science, but this group is instead interested in critiquing the supposed objectivity of their discipline, and giving credence to subjective perspectives. Even more, the editors aim to analyze history through the lens of multiple feminisms. I opened a dialogue with one of the editors of RE/VISIONIST, and in true feminist style, she responded to my questions by conducting a roundtable discussion amongst the staff.

Continue reading “Women’s History Has Many Points of View”

R/V Staff Bids Farewell

By Rosamund Hunter, Thea Michailides, Victoria Sollecito, Nydia Swaby, and Kate Wadkins

When we founded RE/VISIONIST (R/V), we knew we wanted to keep it integral to the Sarah Lawrence College (SLC) community and hoped that the publication would continue after we were no longer students.  With graduation upon us, we are sad to leave our positions as staff but extremely excited to announce our new editors, Caroline Biggs, Katrina Brown, and Amanda Seybold.  We feel fortunate to put RE/VISIONIST in good hands.  Caroline, Katrina, and Amanda are committed to maintaining our dedication to thoughtful, productive dialogue, and we know they will exceed our expectations for all that is possible for RE/VISIONIST. 

We are grateful to SLC’s Women’s History Graduate program—in particular co-directors Priscilla Murolo and Rona Holub and Dean of the Graduate School Susan Guma—whose encouragement and financial support has allowed us to continue the publication here at the college.  We established RE/VISIONIST because we, as students, wanted to keep the classroom conversations going. Now, almost two years later, it is rewarding to have had readers and contributors from all walks of life and all around the globe.  Editing this publication has provided a unique opportunity to learn about some of the amazing skills and talents that our friends and colleagues have—whether it was discovering that our classmates are also excellent copyeditors, web editors, marketers and all around organizers; learning about alternative approaches to communication and feminist organizing from one another; or just discovering people’s hidden passions and talents through their submissions. The collaborative aspect has made us appreciative of the power and effectiveness of group efforts.

Continue reading “R/V Staff Bids Farewell”