WELCOME TO THE 2012 WOMEN’S HISTORY CONFERENCE ISSUE!

Well Hello There! March is Women’s History Month which means it’s time for the 14th Annual Women’s History Conference at Sarah Lawrence College {home to first-ever women’s history program and the subsequent founders of Women’s History Month}! To celebrate this year’s conference, R/V decided to profile some of this year’s most buzz-worthy presenters and performers! And, in spirit of the conference theme, “Women, the Arts … Continue reading WELCOME TO THE 2012 WOMEN’S HISTORY CONFERENCE ISSUE!

Spring Break Feminist Smorgasbord: Violence Against Women Act, Stage 2 of OWS, & Men for Women’s Choice

ARE YOU A SLUT FLOWCHART– via Mother Jones Jezebel translates this NY Times piece for us: Why do Republicans oppose the Violence Against Women Act, the once-bipartisan legislation extending domestic violence protection services to women across the U.S.? But the part of the Violence Against Women act that really chaps Jeff Sessions’ ass is the provision that would grants temporary visas to undocumented immigrants who … Continue reading Spring Break Feminist Smorgasbord: Violence Against Women Act, Stage 2 of OWS, & Men for Women’s Choice

FEATURE: Artist Tiffany Latrice Williams, First-Year MA Student in Women’s History

Tiffany hails from Chatanooga, TN. She studied at USC where she minored in Art. She is currently a first-year student in SLC’s Women’s History MA program. The artist is inspired by Angela Davis, Assata Shakur, Huey Newton, and Richard Pryor in developing her vision. Learn more about Tiffany’s work at her fabulous website. Continue reading FEATURE: Artist Tiffany Latrice Williams, First-Year MA Student in Women’s History

SNEAK PEEK: Alumnae Roz Hunter & Kate Wadkins, with Sarah Hanks & Lauren Denitzio, “Supporting the Scene: Creating and Curating A Feminist Safer Space”

Roz Hunter, Kate Wadkins, Sarah Hanks, and Lauren Denitzio host a panel that discusses their work in New York-based “For the Birds,” a feminist social justice group and arts-based collective. Through For the Birds, they have curated art and music shows, promoted community networking, and disseminated feminist information; this paper thus discusses the ways that gender informs their curatorial practice and their understanding of “safer … Continue reading SNEAK PEEK: Alumnae Roz Hunter & Kate Wadkins, with Sarah Hanks & Lauren Denitzio, “Supporting the Scene: Creating and Curating A Feminist Safer Space”

HYPERCOLOR

“The whole world, as we experience it visually comes to us through the mystic realm of color.” – Hans Hofmann {Liz Atzberger is a Brooklyn-based artist who creates  installation art from all mediums, but most famously with plasticings, magnets, and other unconventional sources.} {Liz Atzberger’s installation “Rods and Cones” is part of HYPERCOLOR, an exhibit at Small Black Door in Ridgewood, Queens.} {You can find more of … Continue reading HYPERCOLOR

Q & A with SLC MFA Student & Professor, Jamie Agnello & Greta Minsky, Co-Directing “MIXED RELIEF”

Re/visionist asked a few questions of Jamie Agnello, an MFA candidate in both SLC’s Theatre and Poetry programs, and Greta Minsky, her co-director, a professor in the Theatre program and MA candidate in the Women’s History program. R/V: Tell us about your project. J & G: MIXED RELIEF will be a glimpse of some great women writers, directors, and actors. You might pick up a few … Continue reading Q & A with SLC MFA Student & Professor, Jamie Agnello & Greta Minsky, Co-Directing “MIXED RELIEF”

Ten Questions

{This month features President of Sarah Lawrence College, Karen Lawrence.  A noted scholar of James Joyce, holding a B.A. from Yale University, a Master of Arts in English Literature from Tufts University, and a Ph.D. in literature from Columbia University, she has been at Sarah Lawrence since 2007.} Describe yourself in one word:         Short To date, what do you consider your greatest accomplishment?     Professionally– securing … Continue reading Ten Questions

SNEAK PEEK: Andrea J.M. Harms, “Domestic Art: The Professionalization of ‘Accomplishment’ Painting in 19th Century Literature”

Andrea J. M. Harms was the graduate assistant to director of Women’s Studies at Indiana University of Pennsylvania from 2009-2011. This experience greatly influenced her research on 19th century British and American women’s literature. She is currently working on her dissertation titled, “Answering the Woman Question: Domestic Professionalism of Women Writers and Women Painters in 19th Century American and British Women’s Literature.” In this paper, … Continue reading SNEAK PEEK: Andrea J.M. Harms, “Domestic Art: The Professionalization of ‘Accomplishment’ Painting in 19th Century Literature”

SNEAK PEEK: Kristin Moriah, “Performing Race & Gender Onstage: 19th-Century African-American Women’s Performance and Literature”

In this presentation, Kristin Moriah analyzes the contributions of 19th-century African-American women performers in domestic and international contexts through teh reading of plays, novels, performance reviews, and journalistic accounts of the reception of their performances. Her study also considers representations of black women found on sheet music, playbills, and broadsides. These documents illuminate the cultural context from which early African-American women’s stage performaces emerged and … Continue reading SNEAK PEEK: Kristin Moriah, “Performing Race & Gender Onstage: 19th-Century African-American Women’s Performance and Literature”

SNEAK PEEK: Sara Lampert, “The Actress as Heroine: Female Celebrity & Cultural Feminism in the 1850s”

Lampert’s paper explores the connection between female celebrity around the dramatic stage, the project of great woman biography, and mid-19th-century feminism. It uses Anna Mowatt’s Autiobiography of an Actress as an entry into a key historical moment in which American actresses experienmented with new forms of femininity on stage while simultaneously transforming and expanding the scope of female celebrity. Lampert argues that this expansion of … Continue reading SNEAK PEEK: Sara Lampert, “The Actress as Heroine: Female Celebrity & Cultural Feminism in the 1850s”