Dances with Disney: Disrupting Indigenous Stereotypes in Children’s Media

By Rachael Nuckles As Native American Heritage Month comes to an end, I’ve been thinking about media representation and how various stereotypes have been perpetuated in television throughout history. This month also marked the release of the new streaming platform, Disney Plus. The media powerhouse, while most often associated with children’s programming, is responsible for much of the media we consume. Most recently, Disney acquired … Continue reading Dances with Disney: Disrupting Indigenous Stereotypes in Children’s Media

Attacks on the Native American Church and the Settler-Colonial Nature of the War on Drugs

By Noelle Iati Modern Peyotism, a religious tradition incorporated in the United States mainly under the name of the Native American Church (and also the smaller and slightly different Peyote Way Church of God), emerged in the mid-19th century in Oklahoma Territory. It involves an overnight, community-based ceremony in which the peyote cactus, considered a gift from God or a sacrament, is eaten by believers. … Continue reading Attacks on the Native American Church and the Settler-Colonial Nature of the War on Drugs

Hidden History, Lost Heroes, and the Forgotten Hawaiian Kingdom

By Katia Kalei Barricklow This November marks the fifth month of protests on Mauna Kea by native Hawaiians who oppose a poorly managed thirty-meter telescope being built on sacred land. This may come as a shock to people living on the U.S. mainland who view Hawaiʻi as a tropical island paradise full of smiling, easygoing natives. But the truth of the matter is that native … Continue reading Hidden History, Lost Heroes, and the Forgotten Hawaiian Kingdom

Native American Boarding Schools: Total Assimilation

By Sidney Wegener In 1892 Richard Pratt, founder of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School, famously stated that his goal was to “kill the Indian and save the man.” Native American boarding schools were first established in the United States during the mid-1800s in an effort to continue genocide against Native people under the guise of education. Children were often taken from their families and away … Continue reading Native American Boarding Schools: Total Assimilation

painting of pilgrims and indians sitting down to eat at the first Thanksgiving

Dismantling the Thanksgiving Myth with Children’s and YA Literature

By Rebecca Hopman It’s that time of year when many elementary school kids across the United States don capotains, buckle boots, headdresses, and moccasins to celebrate Thanksgiving. Cue the romanticized and often derogatory imagery of Native Americans, the tidy and tired story of the Pilgrims and Indians where “everyone gets along [and] everyone gets to eat.” [1] Earlier this month, Sidney Wegener wrote about “Why … Continue reading Dismantling the Thanksgiving Myth with Children’s and YA Literature

Appropriating Indigenous Culture through Body Modification

By Marian Phillips We’ve all seen the image of a young white woman in a traditional Native American headdress prancing around Coachella. Every year, the image grows increasingly distasteful and racist. Despite the internet’s call for festival goers to abandon this appropriation of a culture that is not theirs, they have not. Recently, it was brought to my attention that a cast member of the … Continue reading Appropriating Indigenous Culture through Body Modification

Federal Policies Negatively Effecting Indigenous Food Sovereignty

By Hannah McCandless From July 2017 to June 2018, I had the privilege of working as a fellow at the National Farm to School Network in Washington, D.C. During my time there, I learned about the federal policies and acts that are driving our federal food aid policies, such as The Farm Bill, Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP; formerly known as Food Stamps), and the … Continue reading Federal Policies Negatively Effecting Indigenous Food Sovereignty

Why We Should Be Anti-Celebrating Thanksgiving

By Sidney Wegener Often, on the last Thursday of November, American families gather around the dinner table to eat and appreciate the blessings in their lives. For many, Thanksgiving is a favorite “holiday.” In the twenty-first century, it may be depicted as a happy family eating lots of food and soon rushing off for Black Friday sales. However, this picture is painted for those who … Continue reading Why We Should Be Anti-Celebrating Thanksgiving