Mad and Valid: On Finding a Voice as a Women’s Historian

By Rachael Nuckles For the past few months, somewhere beneath the surface, I have been experiencing an unnamed emotion struggling to make itself known. This semester, I made it a goal to find my voice and let it be heard; staying true to that goal, I have been wrestling continuously with questions and concerns about my newfound identity as “women’s historian.” Doing history is not … Continue reading Mad and Valid: On Finding a Voice as a Women’s Historian

A Response to Everyone Who Asks me “Why Women’s and Gender History?”

By Madison Filzer Oftentimes I’m bombarded with the question, “Why would you get a master’s degree in Women’s And Gender History?” As if the work of Women and Gender Historians is insignificant and unnecessary with little to no place in a world outside of academia. This question suggests that I have done something wrong by choosing this path rather than attending law school straight out … Continue reading A Response to Everyone Who Asks me “Why Women’s and Gender History?”

Amina Wadud and Sherine Hafez: Activism and the Voices of Women in Arab Societies

By Marian Phillips During the final semester of my undergraduate degree at the University of Kansas, I took a course titled “Religion, Power, and Sexuality in Arab Societies” with Dr. Marwa Ghazali.  The course and the professor made a deep and everlasting impact on me. Throughout the course, I gained an abundance of knowledge on a variety of topics in Arab societies, such as religion, … Continue reading Amina Wadud and Sherine Hafez: Activism and the Voices of Women in Arab Societies

Carrie Chapman Catt: Suffrage and the Politics of Race

By Crystal Brandenburgh This summer marks the 100th anniversary of American women gaining the constitutional right to vote through the 19th Amendment. The upcoming centennial has sparked a flurry of new scholarship, including a reckoning over the often racist tactics of White suffragists, the exclusion of diverse voices from the suffrage movement, and the disfranchisement of Southern Black women, Native American women, and Asian immigrant … Continue reading Carrie Chapman Catt: Suffrage and the Politics of Race

A Meditation on Women’s History

By Sidney Wegener Not long ago, I found myself in an debate over what women’s history is with a woman who was white, cisgender, heterosexual, able bodied, and very wealthy. Her argument was that women’s history meant “all women” and there should be no need to differentiate between the histories of Black women and white women or trans women and cis women. In response, I … Continue reading A Meditation on Women’s History