A Backstage History: Reflections on Stage Management and Gendered Labor

By Rachael Nuckles Before I devoted my life to full-time graduate school and academics, I was working hands-on in the world of technical theater as a stage manager and designer. It’s a world I hope to get back to after obtaining my degree, though maybe in a different capacity than before. Stage management often requires a considerable amount of emotional energy that isn’t always part … Continue reading A Backstage History: Reflections on Stage Management and Gendered Labor

LGBTQIA+, Race, Class, Disability, and Region: The American Healthcare System

By Sidney Wegener Every time I visit a doctor, I am asked a series of questions which include those about my sexual health. “Are you sexually active?” Yes. “Do you need a pregnancy test?” No. Oftentimes, a physician responds by informing me that even if I use protection I can still get pregnant. My response triggers confusion and a moment of awkwardness: I’m a lesbian; … Continue reading LGBTQIA+, Race, Class, Disability, and Region: The American Healthcare System

Mad and Valid: On Finding a Voice as a Women’s Historian

By Rachael Nuckles For the past few months, somewhere beneath the surface, I have been experiencing an unnamed emotion struggling to make itself known. This semester, I made it a goal to find my voice and let it be heard; staying true to that goal, I have been wrestling continuously with questions and concerns about my newfound identity as “women’s historian.” Doing history is not … Continue reading Mad and Valid: On Finding a Voice as a Women’s Historian

A Response to Everyone Who Asks me “Why Women’s and Gender History?”

By Madison Filzer Oftentimes I’m bombarded with the question, “Why would you get a master’s degree in Women’s And Gender History?” As if the work of Women and Gender Historians is insignificant and unnecessary with little to no place in a world outside of academia. This question suggests that I have done something wrong by choosing this path rather than attending law school straight out … Continue reading A Response to Everyone Who Asks me “Why Women’s and Gender History?”

Amina Wadud and Sherine Hafez: Activism and the Voices of Women in Arab Societies

By Marian Phillips During the final semester of my undergraduate degree at the University of Kansas, I took a course titled “Religion, Power, and Sexuality in Arab Societies” with Dr. Marwa Ghazali.  The course and the professor made a deep and everlasting impact on me. Throughout the course, I gained an abundance of knowledge on a variety of topics in Arab societies, such as religion, … Continue reading Amina Wadud and Sherine Hafez: Activism and the Voices of Women in Arab Societies

Carrie Chapman Catt: Suffrage and the Politics of Race

By Crystal Brandenburgh This summer marks the 100th anniversary of American women gaining the constitutional right to vote through the 19th Amendment. The upcoming centennial has sparked a flurry of new scholarship, including a reckoning over the often racist tactics of White suffragists, the exclusion of diverse voices from the suffrage movement, and the disfranchisement of Southern Black women, Native American women, and Asian immigrant … Continue reading Carrie Chapman Catt: Suffrage and the Politics of Race

A Meditation on Women’s History

By Sidney Wegener Not long ago, I found myself in an debate over what women’s history is with a woman who was white, cisgender, heterosexual, able bodied, and very wealthy. Her argument was that women’s history meant “all women” and there should be no need to differentiate between the histories of Black women and white women or trans women and cis women. In response, I … Continue reading A Meditation on Women’s History

Margaret Garner: Putting the History Back in Historical Fiction

By Madison Filzer An engraving of the story of Margaret Garner, from Harper’s Weekly in 1867. Well for starters, Happy Black History Month! May this month, and every other month, remind us of where we come from and what we can do in order to honor the stories of those who are often forgotten. History comes from many different places and is rendered in many … Continue reading Margaret Garner: Putting the History Back in Historical Fiction

Black History Happening Now

The following list was compiled by the current editors of the Re/Visionist to provide a glimpse at Black history being made today. While this list is certainly not exhaustive, we hope it will showcase the variety of achievements in Black history’s recent past. Ava DuVernay: An American filmmaker and film distributor, DuVernay was the first black woman to be nominated for a Golden Globe for … Continue reading Black History Happening Now

Afropunk and Tamar-Kali Brown: The Issue of Universalizing the Riot Grrrl Experience

By Marian Phillips The film The Punk Singer (2013), directed by Sini Anderson (a white woman), took the world by storm in the 21st century when it exposed the importance of punk music to women as a way to express feminist ideologies. Anderson’s documentary focuses on frontwoman Kathleen Hanna of the band Bikini Kill and noted founder of the “Riot Grrrl” movement. The trailer to … Continue reading Afropunk and Tamar-Kali Brown: The Issue of Universalizing the Riot Grrrl Experience