“The Poorer Sick”: American Gynecology and its Irish Subjects in Mid-Nineteenth Century New York City

By Charlotte Rich In April 2018, crowds gathered on Manhattan’s Fifth Avenue to watch the dismantling of the statue of J. Marion Sims (1813-1883), the so-called “Father of Gynecology.” [1] The monument was constructed in 1892 to celebrate Sims’ contributions to gynecological research, including developing groundbreaking surgeries to treat women from Alabama to New York City to Europe. [2] For over one hundred years, the … Continue reading “The Poorer Sick”: American Gynecology and its Irish Subjects in Mid-Nineteenth Century New York City

Their Body, a Judge’s Choice: The Kansas Judicial Bypass Process Must Be Revised

By Marian Phillips Warning: This piece contains sensitive subject matter pertaining to the legal processes that minors face when requesting abortion access. There are mentions of abuse (physical and sexual) and abortion.  Reproductive rights are constantly debated within the political arena whether at the state or federal level. It is imperative to continually adjust and reformat legislation that dictates the rights that minors have over … Continue reading Their Body, a Judge’s Choice: The Kansas Judicial Bypass Process Must Be Revised

A Backstage History: Reflections on Stage Management and Gendered Labor

By Rachael Nuckles Before I devoted my life to full-time graduate school and academics, I was working hands-on in the world of technical theater as a stage manager and designer. It’s a world I hope to get back to after obtaining my degree, though maybe in a different capacity than before. Stage management often requires a considerable amount of emotional energy that isn’t always part … Continue reading A Backstage History: Reflections on Stage Management and Gendered Labor

LGBTQIA+, Race, Class, Disability, and Region: The American Healthcare System

By Sidney Wegener Every time I visit a doctor, I am asked a series of questions which include those about my sexual health. “Are you sexually active?” Yes. “Do you need a pregnancy test?” No. Oftentimes, a physician responds by informing me that even if I use protection I can still get pregnant. My response triggers confusion and a moment of awkwardness: I’m a lesbian; … Continue reading LGBTQIA+, Race, Class, Disability, and Region: The American Healthcare System

Mad and Valid: On Finding a Voice as a Women’s Historian

By Rachael Nuckles For the past few months, somewhere beneath the surface, I have been experiencing an unnamed emotion struggling to make itself known. This semester, I made it a goal to find my voice and let it be heard; staying true to that goal, I have been wrestling continuously with questions and concerns about my newfound identity as “women’s historian.” Doing history is not … Continue reading Mad and Valid: On Finding a Voice as a Women’s Historian

A Response to Everyone Who Asks me “Why Women’s and Gender History?”

By Madison Filzer Oftentimes I’m bombarded with the question, “Why would you get a master’s degree in Women’s And Gender History?” As if the work of Women and Gender Historians is insignificant and unnecessary with little to no place in a world outside of academia. This question suggests that I have done something wrong by choosing this path rather than attending law school straight out … Continue reading A Response to Everyone Who Asks me “Why Women’s and Gender History?”

Amina Wadud and Sherine Hafez: Activism and the Voices of Women in Arab Societies

By Marian Phillips During the final semester of my undergraduate degree at the University of Kansas, I took a course titled “Religion, Power, and Sexuality in Arab Societies” with Dr. Marwa Ghazali.  The course and the professor made a deep and everlasting impact on me. Throughout the course, I gained an abundance of knowledge on a variety of topics in Arab societies, such as religion, … Continue reading Amina Wadud and Sherine Hafez: Activism and the Voices of Women in Arab Societies

Carrie Chapman Catt: Suffrage and the Politics of Race

By Crystal Brandenburgh This summer marks the 100th anniversary of American women gaining the constitutional right to vote through the 19th Amendment. The upcoming centennial has sparked a flurry of new scholarship, including a reckoning over the often racist tactics of White suffragists, the exclusion of diverse voices from the suffrage movement, and the disfranchisement of Southern Black women, Native American women, and Asian immigrant … Continue reading Carrie Chapman Catt: Suffrage and the Politics of Race

A Meditation on Women’s History

By Sidney Wegener Not long ago, I found myself in an debate over what women’s history is with a woman who was white, cisgender, heterosexual, able bodied, and very wealthy. Her argument was that women’s history meant “all women” and there should be no need to differentiate between the histories of Black women and white women or trans women and cis women. In response, I … Continue reading A Meditation on Women’s History