Mi’Shaye Venerable: Black, Queer, Woman Activist and Community Organizer

Video recorded by Mi’Shaye Venerable. Synthesis written by ReVisionist sr. editor, Sidney Wegener, and approved by Mi’Shaye Venerable. Mi’Shaye Venerable is a California State University Stanislaus alumni as well as an organizer and activist in the Sacramento area. She has been organizing Black Lives Matter protests in the Sacramento area alongside three other queer Black women. As a collective, they call for accountability and defunding … Continue reading Mi’Shaye Venerable: Black, Queer, Woman Activist and Community Organizer

Margaret Garner: Putting the History Back in Historical Fiction

By Madison Filzer An engraving of the story of Margaret Garner, from Harper’s Weekly in 1867. Well for starters, Happy Black History Month! May this month, and every other month, remind us of where we come from and what we can do in order to honor the stories of those who are often forgotten. History comes from many different places and is rendered in many … Continue reading Margaret Garner: Putting the History Back in Historical Fiction

Heterosexism, Sex & Sexuality: A Conversation about Black Male Privilege

On Wednesday, November 3 Steven G. Fullwood, project director of the Black Gay & Lesbian Archive Project, will engage Jewel Woods, author of The Black Male Privileges Checklist, in a discussion about, you guessed it, black male privilege. Woods, the founder and director of the Renaissance Male Project, an organization committed to building a community of practice around men’s issue while addressing intimate partner violence and sexual … Continue reading Heterosexism, Sex & Sexuality: A Conversation about Black Male Privilege

Act Like A Lady, Think Like An Industry: A Critique of Self-Help(ism)

by Alexandria Linn


In the midst of deconstructing some notion regarding identity politics (or something along that matter), I received a call from my mother. Upon answering the phone I was promptly instructed to turn on the TV. Apparently, there was a “town hall” meeting for the “community” of black women in which black comedians and actors were to inform us on why we can’t land “good black brotha’s.” After turning to the program and reading the title (which read something along the lines of “Black Town Hall: Why Successful Black Women Can’t Get A Successful Black Brother”) I sighed deeply to ensure my mother that I was both thoroughly annoyed at the title and utterly exhausted with the subject in general. Continue reading “Act Like A Lady, Think Like An Industry: A Critique of Self-Help(ism)”