Of the Cloth: The Question of Women’s Ordination in the Catholic Church

by Thea Michailides

The Roman Catholic Church is the epitome of a patriarchal institution. In the early 1960’s, as movements for social change were gaining momentum the Catholic Church seemed poised to make reforms that would mark its entrance into a new era with dramatic and unprecedented institutional changes. The Second Vatican council, convened in 1962, held the promise of making the Catholic Church relevant in the modern world. Catholic reformers hoped Vatican II would facilitate modernization throughout Church practice and doctrine. For Catholic women – lay and religious – Vatican II did not realize its full potential. As women in general were beginning to identify the institutions and ideologies of their subjugation, Catholic laywomen recognized the same practices within their faith community that relegated them to secondary status. Continue reading “Of the Cloth: The Question of Women’s Ordination in the Catholic Church”