Chicago Women’s History in Plain Sight: Clara Driscoll (1861-1944)

By Emma Staffaroni This article is part of a three-story series exploring Chicago women’s history. Back in 2007 the New-York Historical Society featured an exhibit called “A New Light on Tiffany: Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls.” Louis Comfort Tiffany, the 19th century decorative arts genius who pioneered the use of stained glass and mosaic, was not a woman, but his glass workers were, and … Continue reading Chicago Women’s History in Plain Sight: Clara Driscoll (1861-1944)

PANEL: Uses of Space: Women’s Global and Local Resistance

March 2, 2013 4:45 PM This panel will be moderated by Dr. Rona Holub, chair of the women’s history department at Sarah Lawrence College.  From Stella Wright to Stellar Homes: Black Women’s Activism and the Newark Tenant Movement 1969-1974 Victoria McCall This paper explores the meanings and significance of the landmark rent strike at the Stella Windsor Wright Homes in Newark, New Jersey, which took place between 1970 … Continue reading PANEL: Uses of Space: Women’s Global and Local Resistance

“In the Service of the Matriarchy”: A Conversation with Author Robert Leleux

by Emma Staffaroni “I am overwhelmed with gratitude for the life I have. The life I get to live is the life imagined by my mother, my grandmother, and my great-grandmother. It’s like Gloria Steinem said: ‘We have to imagine change before we can begin to move toward it.’ I am so grateful for these women who imagined this Manhattan life.” – Robert Leleux Anyone … Continue reading “In the Service of the Matriarchy”: A Conversation with Author Robert Leleux

Mothers’ Pensions: A Case Study in Perceptions of Low-Income Mothers

By Emma Staffaroni The following is edited and excerpted from a paper entitled “Single Mothers, Social Mothers, and Welfare Reform: Maternalism in the Early 20th Century.” Mothers’ Pensions: A Case Study in Perceptions of and Attitudes toward Poor Mothers in the Early Twentieth Century “The justice of today is born of yesterday’s pity.”  –Julia Lathrop In order to fully comprehend the role maternalism–or political motherhood–played … Continue reading Mothers’ Pensions: A Case Study in Perceptions of Low-Income Mothers

Beyond “Love Your Body Week”: Can Feminisms Truly Address the Epidemic of Body Hatred?

By Emma Staffaroni “Whenever woman’s spirit has been threatened, she has taken the control of her body as an avenue of self-expression. The anorectic refusal of food is only the latest in a series of woman’s attempts at self-assertion which at some point have descended directly upon her body. If woman’s body is the site of her protest, then equally the body is the ground on which the … Continue reading Beyond “Love Your Body Week”: Can Feminisms Truly Address the Epidemic of Body Hatred?

Why Women Can’t Afford to Lose Obamacare

By Emma Staffaroni On June 28, 2012, when the Supreme Court upheld the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act known familiarly as “Obamacare,” women around the nation breathed a sigh of relief. Planned Parenthood reports that in the two years since the law’s passage, 20 million women have received preventative health care services. It was Nancy Pelosi  who first publicly stated that under this law, … Continue reading Why Women Can’t Afford to Lose Obamacare

For the Record x Emma Staffaroni

By Emma Staffaroni The Women Who Endure: Long-Distance Racers Find Personal and Community Empowerment A September, 1975 New York Times headline reads: “Women Marathon Runners Are Racing to Equality with Men.” Featuring the story of Kim Merritt, the women’s winner of the 6th annual New York Marathon that year, the journalist, Steve Cady, places Merritt’s story in the context of the turbulent women’s liberation movement … Continue reading For the Record x Emma Staffaroni

SHOW ME WHAT DEMOCRACY LOOKS LIKE: A Foreign City Teaches Me Political Dissent

By Emma Staffaroni Emma Staffaroni is a first-year Master’s candidate in SLC’s Women’s History program. A ruthless feminist, she slays haters with her pen and then eats them for dinner, covered in cheese. She also enjoys basset hounds, trains, and red wine. Before we left for Manhattan the morning of October 15th, my roommate tossed me a letter from the day’s mail, postmarked from Céline, … Continue reading SHOW ME WHAT DEMOCRACY LOOKS LIKE: A Foreign City Teaches Me Political Dissent

Reproductive Justice: A Timeline

By Emma Staffaroni Emma Staffaroni is a first-year Master’s candidate in SLC’s Women’s History program. A ruthless feminist, she slays haters with her pen and then eats them for dinner, covered in cheese. She also enjoys basset hounds, trains, and red wine. Full disclosure: I am 23. That means that up until the last couple of years, most of the fighting for women’s reproductive rights … Continue reading Reproductive Justice: A Timeline

Law, Order, and Sexism: Testimonials from the Law Firm

By Emma Staffaroni Emma Staffaroni is a first-year Master’s candidate in SLC’s Women’s History program. A ruthless feminist, she slays haters with her pen and then eats them for dinner, covered in cheese. She also enjoys basset hounds, trains, and red wine. Behold, a great irony: sexism in the profession of justice. Re/Visionist asked a few women to share their stories of experiencing sexism within … Continue reading Law, Order, and Sexism: Testimonials from the Law Firm