Thinking About Your Options

Once you’re finished with your conference projects and presentations and are headed home for some R&R, maybe you will take some time to think about your future. Perhaps you already have plans for work after you graduate. Maybe you have been efficiently working both to apply for law school or a PhD program while keeping up with this fall’s work. Maybe you’re a first year MA student and are trying to find a summer internship or tossing about thesis topics. Or you could be heading to an archives for some primary source research…

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Visiting the archives.

While you’re thinking about it, I found this interesting post on AHA Today. As MA students, we may be a few years off from this stage of the game, but Caroline Séquin of the University of Chicago tells us how she put her graduate work to use at a feminist journal:

Historians in Training: Interning at an Academic Journal (11/7/2016, AHA Today)
*Image from the Texas State Library and Archives Commission (http://ow.ly/BY9I3074mrN)
“TSLAC Behind the Scenes: THF Tours the Texas State Archives 1.17.14”
Attribution 2.0 Generic (CC BY 2.0)
License: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/legalcode
No changes were made to this image.

Two events at Sarah Lawrence! Mimosa Brunch & Jessie Ramey Speaks

Thursday, September 23, 6:00PM
at the Wrexham Living Room

The Women’s History Graduate Program Presents:

A Child Care Crisis: Black and White Working Parents and the History of Orphanages: A Talk by Jessie Ramey ‘01

Despite our Charles Dickens-like cultural memory of orphanages as grim repositories of parentless children, most “orphans” at the turn of the twentieth century had one, and sometimes two, living parents. Reeling from the effects of the new urban, industrial economy, working-class families often confronted overlapping stressors, from low wages and factory accidents, to inadequate housing and the loss of a spouse, any of which could plunge them into a childcare crisis. Dr. Ramey’s research re-conceptualizes orphanages as a form of childcare, examining the way that working parents used the institutions as a family survival strategy from the 1880s through the 1920s. Continue reading