Making her Voice Heard at Speaker’s Corner: The Work of Latifa Echakhch at the Tate Modern

by Jen Westmoreland Bouchard

Latifa Echakhch, Speakers Corner 2008 and Fantasia 2008 © The artist, installation at Tate. Photo: Tate Photography

Born in El Khnansa, Morocco in 1974, Latifa Echakhch has lived most of her life in France and now resides and works in both Paris and Martigny, Switzerland.  Echakhch’s work focuses primarily on themes of cultural identity, agency, globalization, and immigration.  Her 2006 work, Hospitality, explores the bureaucratic obstacles faced by immigrants to France and the ways in which these “outsiders” are perceived by their Western counterparts. In the fall of 2008, I had the opportunity to view Echakhch’s installation, Speaker’s Corner, on display in London’s Tate Modern.   The installation is made up of two parts residing in separate rooms.  Though physically separate, they relate to one another thematically on many levels.  For Each Stencil Revolution 2007 is a room of dark blue carbon paper layered over the entirety of each of the four walls.  The title of this section harkens back to international human rights and war protests of the 1960s, during which carbon paper was used to create multiple copies of flyers, statements, and images. Continue reading “Making her Voice Heard at Speaker’s Corner: The Work of Latifa Echakhch at the Tate Modern”