“Articulating the Feeling is Hard”: Women and the Emo Revival

By Marian Phillips During the 1980s, the first wave of emo music was born. An offshoot from Washington, D.C. hardcore bands, the musical genre introduced the world to traditional punk stylistic elements mixed with emotional vulnerability and poetic lyrics. Most notably, emo’s roots can be traced to Rites of Spring, making them the fathers of emo. In the beginning of the 1990s, the Midwest became … Continue reading “Articulating the Feeling is Hard”: Women and the Emo Revival

Appropriating Indigenous Culture through Body Modification

By Marian Phillips We’ve all seen the image of a young white woman in a traditional Native American headdress prancing around Coachella. Every year, the image grows increasingly distasteful and racist. Despite the internet’s call for festival goers to abandon this appropriation of a culture that is not theirs, they have not. Recently, it was brought to my attention that a cast member of the … Continue reading Appropriating Indigenous Culture through Body Modification

Architects of Horror: Alice Guy-Blaché, Ida Lupino and Paula Maxa

By Marian Phillips Marian Phillips is a second year Master’s candidate at Sarah Lawrence College studying Women’s History. When I was thinking about what I was going to write about during the month of October, I considered everything I knew about women and feminism mixed with the horrific, absurd, and surreal. I thought about women I have written about previously (Diablo Cody, Karyn Kusama, and … Continue reading Architects of Horror: Alice Guy-Blaché, Ida Lupino and Paula Maxa

Jennifer’s Body (2009): Sexuality and Social Relevance in Diablo Cody and Karyn Kusama’s Cult Classic Horror Film

By Marian Phillips Marian is a second year graduate student studying Women’s History at Sarah Lawrence College. Her interests include LGBT+ History, Media and Film Studies, and the use of music and movements. Spoiler alert: This post contains spoilers for Jennifer’s Body (2009). Ten years ago, in the fall of 2009, I was thirteen years old. I was hanging out at the mall, waiting for … Continue reading Jennifer’s Body (2009): Sexuality and Social Relevance in Diablo Cody and Karyn Kusama’s Cult Classic Horror Film

Stranger Things, Erica Sinclair, and the Representation of Black Women in the Science Fiction Genre

By Marian Phillips Marian is a second year Master’s student at Sarah Lawrence College in Women’s History. Her interests include popular culture, LGBT+ history, and the history of movements through music.  Spoiler alert: This blog contains spoilers from season three of Stranger Things.  On October 27, 2017, the highly anticipated second season of the Duffer Brothers’ Netflix original series, Stranger Things, premiered. Coated in mid-1980s … Continue reading Stranger Things, Erica Sinclair, and the Representation of Black Women in the Science Fiction Genre

The Mattachine Society: Henry “Harry” Hay and Harold “Hal” Call

By Marian Phillips Marian is a second year graduate student in the Women’s History program at Sarah Lawrence College. A year ago, when I began my Master’s research on homosexuality during the 1950s in America, I was certain that there was an abundance of research on the topic. I didn’t think there was anything more to discover that John D’Emilio, David Allyn, Estelle Freedman, Allan … Continue reading The Mattachine Society: Henry “Harry” Hay and Harold “Hal” Call

Shout for Abortion

By Marian Phillips Marian is a first year in the Women’s History Program at Sarah Lawrence College. Content warning: Abortion. Over the past few months, Americans have witnessed bill after bill proposed to restrict abortion access in multiple states. At this current juncture, these states include Georgia, Missouri, Ohio, and Alabama. State senators have taken it upon themselves to decide what every individual that is … Continue reading Shout for Abortion

The Construction of Black Women’s Sexuality from Novel to Film Adaptation

By Marian Phillips Marian is a first year student in the Women’s History Program at Sarah Lawrence College. When novels are adapted into films, scenes and dialogue are left out to appeal to a specific audience and/or to construct thoughts and ideas on the context within the film itself. The novel The Color Purple, written by Alice Walker, and the accompanying film, directed by Steven … Continue reading The Construction of Black Women’s Sexuality from Novel to Film Adaptation

From Los Angeles to New York: Student Activism and the Fight for Justice

By Marian Phillips Marian is a first year student in the Women’s History Program at Sarah Lawrence College. On March 11, 2019, student activists at Sarah Lawrence College swarmed Westlands – the administrative building – at seven in the morning. They called for the college and the administrators to listen to their detailed list of demands which ranged from access to housing opportunities to assistance … Continue reading From Los Angeles to New York: Student Activism and the Fight for Justice

Revolutionary Women of Music: Nina Simone, Poly Styrene, and Valerie Agnew

By Marian Phillips Marian is a first year student in the Women’s History Program at Sarah Lawrence College. This morning on International Women’s Day, March 8, 2019, I woke up to Lizzo’s “Juice” stuck in my head. Off to a good start, I continued my morning routine while Carly Rae Jepsen, Cherry Glazerr, Rico Nasty, and Dream Wife – amongst others – shuffled and played … Continue reading Revolutionary Women of Music: Nina Simone, Poly Styrene, and Valerie Agnew