SLC to Screen Documentary on Masculinity, “Tough Guise” – Tuesday 2/19 @ 8 PM

  TOUGH GUISE: Violence, Media, and the Crisis in Masculinity A documentary by Jackson Katz, Jeremy Earp, and Sut Jhally Film Screening & Discussion Tuesday February 19th, 8pm in Titsworth Lecture Hall (click here to watch the trailer) Further discussion will take place at the Feminist Collective Meeting on Wednesday February 20th at 7pm in the Tea Haus Pizza will be served Brought to you … Continue reading SLC to Screen Documentary on Masculinity, “Tough Guise” – Tuesday 2/19 @ 8 PM

Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: Plan B, Feminist Art, & “Gaslighting”

Bitch media does a series on feminism in art: they ask, “How did you discover Feminist Art?” Frida Kahlo (<3) and Judy Chicago get shout-outs! Go and post your own feminist artists of choice. Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius meddled in the FDA’s decision to make emergency contraception, Plan B, available without prescription to all women of childbearing age. Without a prescription, young … Continue reading Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: Plan B, Feminist Art, & “Gaslighting”

Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: Remembering the Ms. Revolution, the History of ‘Personhood’, and Umbrellas

In honor of its 40th birthday, a fabulous tribute to Ms. magazine at NY Mag. My favorite tid-bit: some of the proposed titles for Ms. included Everywoman, Sisters, Lilith, Sojourner, Female, A Woman’s Place, The First Sex, and The Majority. Plus the article is structured as an oral history, with insights from the pioneers themselves. From Mary Peacock, one of the founding editors: When Ms. … Continue reading Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: Remembering the Ms. Revolution, the History of ‘Personhood’, and Umbrellas

Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: Indigenous People’s Resistance Day

I did not celebrate “Columbus Day” on Monday; did you? Let’s leave it to Howard Zinn to say it straight: To emphasize the heroism of Columbus and his successors as navigators and discoverers, and to de-emphasize their genocide, is not a technical necessity but an ideological choice. It serves- unwittingly-to justify what was done. My point is not that we must, in telling history, accuse, … Continue reading Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: Indigenous People’s Resistance Day

Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: SlutWalk NYC, Wall Street, & Immigration

SlutWalk on this Saturday, October 1st in NYC. Be there!!! (Unless like me, you have to get a root canal.) There are so many reasons to go. What will happen if the media continues to ignore the Wall Street occupation? In fact, the answer  to that question is already playing out, as numerous videos capture violent treatment and arrests of protesters. Check out Occupy Wall … Continue reading Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: SlutWalk NYC, Wall Street, & Immigration

Is He Gay?

by Alexandria Linn

In the fantastic world of relationship self-help, a new dating guide emerged to once again help the lonely American woman land her “dream” guy. Using senseless and sarcastic humor, the markets itself as a guide for women who need to know if their potential suitors are “gay” (according to the author’s understanding of homosexual qualities). For those particular women who want to know how to distinguish between men of the homosexual persuasion, and those who embody all of the violent and neglectful tendencies of the “masculine” male, Ed Baker and Chris Busick have answered the call.

In their book entitled Is He Gay?[1] (for obvious reasons) the two self-help authors follow the story of a young, white and single female as she comes dangerously close to falling in love with a gay man. Despite the author’s attempt to scream commentary to her from the sidelines of the pages, she begins to fall for the homosexual male. Her relationship is sustained by her denial, though she eventually recognizes that the man she’s dating is attracted to other men and not to her.  In the end, the woman leaves the relationship with only small disappointments (fortunately, no deep wounds) and resolves that she still loves him “as a friend”[2].

The good news is that other straight women can steer clear of making the same mistake. By heeding the authors’ advice, one can avoid the queer pitfalls that may occur in the single girl’s dating arena. For those who are not familiar with all the heteronormative ideals of homosexuality, Is He Gay? points out all of the stereotypical tropes associated with “gayness.” The authors, do however attempt to acknowledge their gross generalizations, with a disclaimer at the end of the book that reassures the reader that their mocking was done so “all in good fun,” of course. Continue reading “Is He Gay?”

Act Like A Lady, Think Like An Industry: A Critique of Self-Help(ism)

by Alexandria Linn


In the midst of deconstructing some notion regarding identity politics (or something along that matter), I received a call from my mother. Upon answering the phone I was promptly instructed to turn on the TV. Apparently, there was a “town hall” meeting for the “community” of black women in which black comedians and actors were to inform us on why we can’t land “good black brotha’s.” After turning to the program and reading the title (which read something along the lines of “Black Town Hall: Why Successful Black Women Can’t Get A Successful Black Brother”) I sighed deeply to ensure my mother that I was both thoroughly annoyed at the title and utterly exhausted with the subject in general. Continue reading “Act Like A Lady, Think Like An Industry: A Critique of Self-Help(ism)”