My Mom Made Me Feminist: A Thank You Note of Sorts

By Rachael Nuckles When I imagined my first year of graduate school at Sarah Lawrence College, I pictured myself finishing it out in my apartment in New York, going on my regular coffee date with a friend from the cohort to work on our papers, and citing all of my wonderful findings from the Riot Grrrl Archive at NYU. I packed a bag for a … Continue reading My Mom Made Me Feminist: A Thank You Note of Sorts

Lessons from Post-Soviet Motherhood

By Katya Mushik I am the first-generation daughter of a Ukrainian Jewish immigrant. There are many lessons I’ve painstakingly had to learn of what Post-Soviet motherhood is really like. Lesson one: don’t date Slavic men. One evening in Ukraine, I walked into a modern, multi-colored apartment with my mother. We’re in Obolon, the upper echelons of Post-Soviet suburbia. For the first time, I meet my … Continue reading Lessons from Post-Soviet Motherhood

Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: Shame-Free Sex, Katie Roiphe (Eye-Roll), and Twilight

The brilliant Jaclyn Friedman, feminist activist and writer, has finally come out with her new book, What You Really Really Want:The Smart Girl’s Shame-Free Guide to Sex and Safety. Read a review at Where is your line? and an interview with Friedman at Feministing. Now I know what I’m getting everybody for Xmas/Hannukah. To paraphrase Rachel Maddow, this is the Best New Thing this week. … Continue reading Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: Shame-Free Sex, Katie Roiphe (Eye-Roll), and Twilight

Some links!!: Mother’s Day stories, a sweet zine, and how to deal with anger

The U.S. Maternal Healthcare Crisis: 14 Numbers You Need to Know Science & Sensibility: “Mother’s Day is May 8. At Amnesty International USA, we’re honoring mothers by fighting for maternal health — sending Mother’s Day action cards to U.S. and international decision-makers, hosting events and more (sign up at amnestyusa.org/mothersday).  Amnesty is also launching a One-Year Update to our groundbreaking report, Deadly Delivery: The Maternal Health Care … Continue reading Some links!!: Mother’s Day stories, a sweet zine, and how to deal with anger

Happy Mother’s Day: On Choice and Childbirth in the U.S.

I’m writing this Mother’s Day post through a fog of a nasty sickness, so I can’t guarantee it will be as polished as I intend. My hope is that it will make a modicum of sense! I am here on this day to write about the issue of childbirth, choice, maternal healthcare and the violations that are rampant in the U.S. regarding all of these things. I want to open the conversation up about an aspect of women’s choice that I have not heard discussed even once in mainstream feminist circles: The choices that women should have to decide how and where they want to have their babies.

Yesterday, with my throat too sore and my brain to busy to sleep, but my body too sick and tired to do much of anything I came across the documentary “Pregnant in America: A Nation’s Miscarriage” on netflix, available for instant view. Despite the fact that the average childbearing age in the U.S. is 29.4 years old, and I am a mere 25 years old, I can think of a dozen women around my age who are my good friends who have kids (many of them have more than 1 by now) or are pregnant. And that is just off the top of my head! “Why the heck not, I thought. This will be illuminating if nothing else,” so I watched it. And mind = blown, a little bit.

Continue reading “Happy Mother’s Day: On Choice and Childbirth in the U.S.”

So Far This Week: Osama’s death, the GOP and rape/abortion, the history of rainbow pride, and more!

Hey hey hello there! I was trying to wait until the end of the week to post links, but all of a sudden this morning I already had so many. Here are some the news bits that have caught my eye so far this week. Enjoy! – Katrina In Search Of Meaning: Osama Bin Laden and the Dancing Americans Mondoweiss: “Those of us that know … Continue reading So Far This Week: Osama’s death, the GOP and rape/abortion, the history of rainbow pride, and more!

‘Don’t You Talk About My Mama!’: Black Women Writers and the Reconstruction of Motherhood

‘Don’t You Talk About My Mama!’[1]:
Black Women Writers and the Reconstruction of Motherhood

by Anne Louise Cranwell

My thesis project was inspired by my love for the work of author Toni Morrison.  After reading Beloved for the third or fourth time, I could not get the main character, Sethe Suggs, out of my mind.  I thought about Sethe’s roles as mother and slave and how the latter institution determined the parameters of the former.  Sethe developed a way of being a mother to her children that denied slavery’s ownership of her body.  She defined motherhood for herself even as her racial identity prohibited such a proclamation. Continue reading “‘Don’t You Talk About My Mama!’: Black Women Writers and the Reconstruction of Motherhood”