“90’s Love,” “Love Washed in Rainbow and Sunshine,” and “Liberation of Mind, The Rise of Consciousness and Destruction of Racism”

By Christina Parker 90’s Love  I want to be the Timmy to your Fairy Odd Parents,  The Wild to Your Thornberry,  The Jimmy to your Neutron,  The Danny to your Phantom,  I’m not promising a fairytale ending,  An All That Show with a Kenan and Kel flow,  I’m not That’s So Raven but my future is dim without you.  Who loves you?  Christina loves you!  … Continue reading “90’s Love,” “Love Washed in Rainbow and Sunshine,” and “Liberation of Mind, The Rise of Consciousness and Destruction of Racism”

“Until They See Us,” “The Peculiar Weight of Holding,” and “Black Corporeality”

By Takia Hill “Until They See Us” They will always look for us Reminding us that we will never be red, white, and blue Even when we are bathed in its lights Even when there is blood, bone, and bruise And when the sirens sound We hide in the nearest patch of soft grass Hold our hands like hummingbirds and Watch star tails leave their … Continue reading “Until They See Us,” “The Peculiar Weight of Holding,” and “Black Corporeality”

Get Your Women’s History Podcasts…

By Amanda Kozar If you’re like me, you are still excited to learn about women’s history even when you’re not in school. If you are stuck on a long car ride or flight, it’s always helpful to have a few podcasts loaded onto your cell phone or tablet.* These podcasts don’t necessarily have a common theme other than “women’s history,” but I think that you … Continue reading Get Your Women’s History Podcasts…

[I liked you better before]: poems

By Jamie Agnello For our pop-cultural issue, Jamie let us use two of her celebrated poems (inspired by the character of Chuck Bass on “Gossip Girl”). You can find more of these linguistic gems at  http://ilikedyoubetterbefore.tumblr.com/ I Liked You Better Before Have a glass of champagne. Please. We’re closing the kitchen early. You think I don’t know why you left town? It’s a party. Things … Continue reading [I liked you better before]: poems

Dis/assembling Identity: From the Margins to the Page

by Muriel Leung

(Note: This paper is a condensed rewrite of an original piece which is currently 60 pages in length)

The emergence of Asian American poetry as a genre is not without its historical grounds. Asian Americans’ contributions to the radical movements of the 1960s and 1970s eras introduced performance, song, and poetry as forms of protest against injustices towards Asian Americans during this politically volatile time. The social and political materials which informed Asian American experience were later solidified as a new type of genre by the spirit of 1980s multiculturalism in which Asian American writers as well as other writers of color began to gain mainstream appeal. The dramatic shift in social and political visibility played a valuable role in the transformation of Asian American identity discourse as it grew from grassroots arts and political movements to earning the institutional legitimacy of academic scholarship.

A discussion of Asian American poetry as a genre and “Asian American” as an identity is impossible without recognition of its social and political grounding. While these were formidable years that demonstrated the efforts of countless Asian American activists and artists to concretize their presence in the traditionally exclusionary U.S. historical narrative, contemporary Asian American identity discourse acknowledges that this identity is more prone to fracture than union. This is not to say that the works of previous Asian American scholars and activists have failed in their efforts. Rather, in the face of dramatically shifting political and social terrains, Asian American poets are challenging traditional ideas of identity formation, and ushering in new themes and styles of exploring Asian American identity which welcome fragmentation. Continue reading “Dis/assembling Identity: From the Margins to the Page”