Set in a Bathroom: “Purity,’’ Race, Gender, and Sexual Prejudice in Bathrooms from 1887 to Today

By Emilyn Kowaleski Emilyn is a second year graduate student in the Women’s History Program at Sarah Lawrence College. The distressed eyes of a young white woman pierce through the camera lens and into the hearts of thousands of North Carolinians. “It’s about privacy. It’s about safety,” she assures them. It is 2016. They are watching an advertisement generated by The Institute of Faith and … Continue reading Set in a Bathroom: “Purity,’’ Race, Gender, and Sexual Prejudice in Bathrooms from 1887 to Today

From Los Angeles to New York: Student Activism and the Fight for Justice

By Marian Phillips Marian is a first year student in the Women’s History Program at Sarah Lawrence College. On March 11, 2019, student activists at Sarah Lawrence College swarmed Westlands – the administrative building – at seven in the morning. They called for the college and the administrators to listen to their detailed list of demands which ranged from access to housing opportunities to assistance … Continue reading From Los Angeles to New York: Student Activism and the Fight for Justice

Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: Vanity Fair, Anti-Choice Race for the Cure, & Jay-Z’s Political Correctness

Happy 2012! We’re back after a long winter break. Here’s a little of what has been going on in feminisms around the web. Vanity Fair has done it again–as per their tradition, they have relegated actresses of color to the hidden fold on their “Fresh Young Stars” of Hollywood cover. Jezebel spells out their egregious trend. This piece is a few weeks old, but it … Continue reading Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: Vanity Fair, Anti-Choice Race for the Cure, & Jay-Z’s Political Correctness

Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: Indigenous People’s Resistance Day

I did not celebrate “Columbus Day” on Monday; did you? Let’s leave it to Howard Zinn to say it straight: To emphasize the heroism of Columbus and his successors as navigators and discoverers, and to de-emphasize their genocide, is not a technical necessity but an ideological choice. It serves- unwittingly-to justify what was done. My point is not that we must, in telling history, accuse, … Continue reading Weekly Feminist Smorgasbord: Indigenous People’s Resistance Day

Welcome to R/V October 2011: The Legal Issue

Welcome to the R/V LEGAL ISSUE! We are beyond thrilled with the response and popularity of last month’s POP CULTURE ISSUE—we’ve been linked, quoted, and shared from NYC to Beirut—and readership has grown to numbers that exceeded even our highest hopes! Most importantly, we are having so much fun conceptualizing and creating a dialogue that appeals to a WIDE RANGE OF FEMINISMS and the issues … Continue reading Welcome to R/V October 2011: The Legal Issue

Miscegenation: A Law Review

Until the Supreme Court’s 1967 decision in Loving v. Virginia, interracial marriage was legally banned in a few states in this country.  Although we may look back and say to ourselves how can that be? That was so recent! the changes in legal thinking that made eradicating all miscegenation laws from the books were actually quite remarkable.  Rather, it was not so much that the … Continue reading Miscegenation: A Law Review

Revisiting the Civil Rights Era: Condoleezza Rice & James Bonard Fowler

I wrote this on November 16th but was hesitant to post it due to recent comments on this blog that reeked of racism and a general distaste for addressing white privilege. Upon revisiting it, I decided it is better published than sitting in our draft box.

Two articles on my reading list this morning brought me back to the Civil Rights Era in American History. First, Latoya Peterson at Racialicious did a great review of Condoleezza Rice’s new book Extraordinary, Ordinary People: A Memoir of Family. Peterson highlighted Rice’s lucid details of the salient threats of violence that ravaged Alabama at this time, while also questioning Rice’s foreign policy more recently.

Then, my attention was brought to Robbie Brown of the New York Times, who reported yesterday that Alabama state trooper James Bonard Fowler finally plead guilty to his “fatal shooting” of Jimmie Lee Jackson, a 26-year-old civil rights activist, in 1965. Fowler considers the shooting self-defense rather than murder. While I write a lot about race in US culture, both articles served as a reminder of how recent this struggle, this violent and contentious time, actually is in our history. Continue reading “Revisiting the Civil Rights Era: Condoleezza Rice & James Bonard Fowler”

Sarah Lawrence grad wins contest, fights stereotypes

Recent Sarah Lawrence graduate Kyle Chu, hailing from San Francisco, won the 2010 Mr. Hyphen contest, an event somewhat based on more traditional beauty pageants and the “signature” event of Hyphen Magazine. Chu discusses his drag performance to Queen, one of the many factors contributing his win. On choosing to do this performance, Chu explains that he wanted to use drag as a “queer tradition” … Continue reading Sarah Lawrence grad wins contest, fights stereotypes

In Canada: City’s anti-racism campaign fights ‘white privilege’

This article was originally posted by Richard Liebrecht of the Edmonton Sun. “A white person looking for an apartment to rent does not face similar challenges that an aboriginal person does,” said Coun. Amarjeet Sohi, explaining what is meant by the phrase white privilege. But Ryan Hastman, the federal Conservative candidate for the Edmonton-Strathcona, said he’s concerned because the campaign’s focus on white people is … Continue reading In Canada: City’s anti-racism campaign fights ‘white privilege’

Post-Election Roundup

It’s been a long and disheartening election season.  Before the race to the presidency begins, let us reflect on some of the more significant aspects of yesterday’s vote and how the candidates got there.

RACISM

Not a term to be tossed around lightly.  Sadly, when it comes down to many Republican candidates this year, this term represents their campaign strategies all too accurately.

ColorLines: The Most Racist Campaign in Decades and What It Demands of Us by Rinku Sen

During the California primary, three Republican gubernatorial candidates pinned all their hopes on vilifying Latino immigrants as criminals. Republican congressional candidates forced the nation into weeks of silly debate about the Park 51 project. They equated Islam with violence and questioned the patriotism of all Muslim Americans, helping to fuel a rash of attacks on mosques nationwide and a threatened Quran burning that spiraled into an international crisis. South Asian Americans Leading Together released a report this week documenting dozens of horrible statements attacking South Asian candidates. South Carolina State Sen. Jake Knotts called Republican gubernatorial candidate Nikki Haley “[a] fucking raghead,” adding, “[w]e got a raghead in Washington; we don’t need one in South Carolina.”

Salon: Presenting the Baitys by Alex Pareene

Are you scared of gang-banging Mexican illegals? Islamic sleeper cell jihadists? Chinese people? Then this was the election cycle for you! From the primaries through the week before election day, America’s been blanketed with race-baiting political campaign ads from insufficiently guarded border to shining sea. Today’s the day when those countless hours spent by soulless political consultants poring over stock images of young Latino men looking for the shot that screams “about to kidnap your daughter” pays off. (Election day, historically, is also that day.) We’re proud to present the first annual Salon Baity Awards for Excellence in the Field of Race-baiting. Continue reading “Post-Election Roundup”