For the NEH…

Historians Joan Kelly, Alice Kessler-Harris, Joan Scott, and Nell Painter, photographer Candacy Taylor, and filmmaker Mira Nair. What do these women have in common? All received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), a government-funded agency now more than a half-century old. Operating under the banner “Because democracy demands wisdom,” the NEH provides funds to “cultural institutions, such as museums, archives, libraries, colleges, … Continue reading For the NEH…

Write for Re/Visionist!

It’s the spring semester, and it’s time to get out your calendar again to set your second semester agenda! Re/Visionist is calling for students to get involved in the production of the Women’s History Program’s blog. Both graduate and undergraduate students of all disciplines are encouraged to participate. As our mission statement says, the blog “aims to promote a critical analysis of history and contemporary … Continue reading Write for Re/Visionist!

Using Government Docs for Women’s History

Over the course of the last semester, I have spent my time researching the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). “Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” Harmless, right? Well, a lot of people, particularly Phyllis Schlafly and STOP ERA, begged to differ. Even so, before the U.S. Senate deliberated … Continue reading Using Government Docs for Women’s History

An Interview with Shirley Stewart MA ’10

Shirley Stewart is an alumnae of the Women’s History Program at Sarah Lawrence College, and the author of The World of Stephanie St. Clair: An Entrepreneur, Race Woman and Outlaw in Early Twentieth Century Harlem. She will be coming to Sarah Lawrence on December 3rd at 5:30 in Heimbold 208. Here is a sneak peek at her research process and advice for those interested in … Continue reading An Interview with Shirley Stewart MA ’10

Finding Feminism in my Grandmother’s Georgia

Dear Grandma, I have often wondered about the days when you were young. The days before your children. The days before you divorced your first husband. Before you fell in love with your second. The days before you sported a perfectly combed Afro. The days when you drove a tractor, plowing your grandfather’s farm. The days when you played the dozens. When I imagine you … Continue reading Finding Feminism in my Grandmother’s Georgia

To My Partner- Marching in Feminism

Dear Kamau Nkosi, You are a silent feminist. Not a loud, verbose, self-righteous, attention-seeking, ‘all-hail-feminism’ type of feminist. You have never been the one to post soliloquies on Facebook to parade your liberalism or acceptance of gender equality. Because, for you, your actions are more important than words posted on a digital platform where sentences and ideas live only for half a second. You are … Continue reading To My Partner- Marching in Feminism

PANEL: Women and Cultural Activism

Saturday, March 2, 2013 at 4:45 PM This panel will be moderated by current SLC Women’s History student, Robert Leleux. Out South of the Salt Line: Lesbians in the Court of Public Opinion Debbie Hicks Tourists recall images of the Gulf South port of Mobile, Alabama: teen Azalea Trail Maids as a pastel curtsy of antebellum hoop skirts; maskers rocking Mardi Gras floats; hurricane flooded … Continue reading PANEL: Women and Cultural Activism

PREVIEW: 15th Annual Women’s History Month Conference in Honor of Amy Swerdlow

Hello women’s history enthusiasts and loyal readers! It’s the most wonderful time of the year– namely, WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH! To kick off the month of March, Sarah Lawrence College’s Women’s History graduate program hosts an annual conference, centered around a theme in women’s history and activism. This year, our conference honors the late Amy Swerdlow, historian, activist, member of Women Strike for Peace, and former … Continue reading PREVIEW: 15th Annual Women’s History Month Conference in Honor of Amy Swerdlow