Benign Soul

by Nicole Hayes My master has a benign soul. Denying me opportunity to learn. Hanging my intellectualism, on branches near the surface. My deep wounds are covered, in bandages too small to mask the pain. I sweep the tears under rugs, allowing darkness to win the battle. I am a slave. Running through fields of stigmas, attached to my brown skin, escaping chains of my … Continue reading Benign Soul

Renewal

Good Morning Revisionaries! In celebration of April, Earth Day, and the end of a long winter, we announce our April theme “Renewal.” We are keeping this topic broad for a reason-renewal is something different for each one of us. Whether spiritual, physical, emotional, artistic, or any of the other ways that we experience rebirth and renewal, we want to hear your stories about what this … Continue reading Renewal

Clean Slates Call for Crafting: How to Make Your Own Vision Board

By Elizabeth Tripp Recently, after a painful breakup, I decided to make my very first vision board. I wanted to turn my heartache into an opportunity to build a better, brighter future for myself. Visualization is a powerful mental exercise and has been proven to increase motivation and confidence. I was also looking for a fun distraction; blissfully, creating my vision board took up an … Continue reading Clean Slates Call for Crafting: How to Make Your Own Vision Board

The Walking Purchase and the Dismissal of the Delaware Nation v. Commonwealth: Legal Institutions as Instruments of the Settler State

by Noelle Iati In 2004, the Delaware Nation sued the owners of over 300 acres of land in the “Forks” region of Northampton County, Pennsylvania, attempting to reclaim possession. The land, they claimed, was tribal land, obtained by Europeans through a fraudulent transaction, then granted to a Native man named Tunda “Moses” Tatamy, and then resold upon his death by Pennsylvania land speculators with no … Continue reading The Walking Purchase and the Dismissal of the Delaware Nation v. Commonwealth: Legal Institutions as Instruments of the Settler State

For the NEH…

Historians Joan Kelly, Alice Kessler-Harris, Joan Scott, and Nell Painter, photographer Candacy Taylor, and filmmaker Mira Nair. What do these women have in common? All received funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH), a government-funded agency now more than a half-century old. Operating under the banner “Because democracy demands wisdom,” the NEH provides funds to “cultural institutions, such as museums, archives, libraries, colleges, … Continue reading For the NEH…

Write for Re/Visionist!

It’s the spring semester, and it’s time to get out your calendar again to set your second semester agenda! Re/Visionist is calling for students to get involved in the production of the Women’s History Program’s blog. Both graduate and undergraduate students of all disciplines are encouraged to participate. As our mission statement says, the blog “aims to promote a critical analysis of history and contemporary … Continue reading Write for Re/Visionist!

Using Government Docs for Women’s History

Over the course of the last semester, I have spent my time researching the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA). “Equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any State on account of sex.” Harmless, right? Well, a lot of people, particularly Phyllis Schlafly and STOP ERA, begged to differ. Even so, before the U.S. Senate deliberated … Continue reading Using Government Docs for Women’s History

An Interview with Shirley Stewart MA ’10

Shirley Stewart is an alumnae of the Women’s History Program at Sarah Lawrence College, and the author of The World of Stephanie St. Clair: An Entrepreneur, Race Woman and Outlaw in Early Twentieth Century Harlem. She will be coming to Sarah Lawrence on December 3rd at 5:30 in Heimbold 208. Here is a sneak peek at her research process and advice for those interested in … Continue reading An Interview with Shirley Stewart MA ’10