The Walking Purchase and the Dismissal of the Delaware Nation v. Commonwealth: Legal Institutions as Instruments of the Settler State

by Noelle Iati In 2004, the Delaware Nation sued the owners of over 300 acres of land in the “Forks” region of Northampton County, Pennsylvania, attempting to reclaim possession. The land, they claimed, was tribal land, obtained by Europeans through a fraudulent transaction, then granted to a Native man named Tunda “Moses” Tatamy, and then resold upon his death by Pennsylvania land speculators with no … Continue reading The Walking Purchase and the Dismissal of the Delaware Nation v. Commonwealth: Legal Institutions as Instruments of the Settler State

Exerting Native Sovereignty in the Time of “Something Else”

By Drs. Nicole Blalock and Cueponcaxochitl D. Moreno Sandoval Feature Photo, courtesy of Dr. Vanessa Esquivido (Nor Rel Muk Wintu, Hupa, and Xicana) Embedded within the United States are five hundred and seventy-four federally recognized, and dozens of state recognized, Native nations [1], and more that are neither state nor federally recognized. These first peoples of the land were her original caretakers before settler colonization, … Continue reading Exerting Native Sovereignty in the Time of “Something Else”

Who Profits off of The Luck Of the Irish?

By Sarah Weinstock The new Crown season dropped Sunday. Being a fan, I immediately bumped up to the first thing on my list of things to watch. The first episode introduced the viewer to the IRA (Irish Republican Army- an organization that was Anti-British colonial rule of Northern Ireland )and the Irish troubles between Northern Ireland and England. I studied mostly British and Irish history … Continue reading Who Profits off of The Luck Of the Irish?

A Queer’s View on Halloween

by Sarah Weinstock I hated Halloween growing up. I never wanted to be the traditional “girly things,” like a princess, cheerleader, fairy, etc. But I did, so I did not stick out. I was anxious and thought everyone was judging me, so I tried to conform in every way possible. As I was trying to “fit in,” I always felt uncomfortable. I was jealous of … Continue reading A Queer’s View on Halloween

to be a (white)(cis)(ablebodied)(college graduate & graduate student) broke & bipolar lesbian

by sidney wegener (she/they) 10/8/20(7:47am) did i forget to eat again (audre lorde wrote) rage sits in my stomachi want to taste iti want my body to want to eat. audre lorde wrote, when you are hungry / learn to eat / whatever sustains you until morning i wonder if something is eating me from the inside outi wonder if it’s hand stitched barbie clothesi … Continue reading to be a (white)(cis)(ablebodied)(college graduate & graduate student) broke & bipolar lesbian

Watch Me As I Slowly Disappear

By Laura Lee You were always a skinny kid. With long hair and longer legs, you ceaselessly ran through eternal summer afternoons. Life, as well as your beauty, was taken for granted; something that would last forever. And then like a dark summer storm, puberty came, and your body was no longer your own. You watched as your blonde hair turned dark, the silken strands … Continue reading Watch Me As I Slowly Disappear

That’s a No From Me: Menstrual Stigma in Carrie

Elizabeth Tripp @MensesInPopCulture Tweeting live from the intersection of pop culture and menstruation ____ About to watch the OG #Carrie. AKA the first major menstruation representation on the screen. *Sigh* I do not want to watch #Carrie. Horror films are a NO from me. #TheThingsWeDoForGradSchool  8:01 PM · Oct 12, 2020 · Twitter for iPhone This opening scene in the girls’ locker room has very … Continue reading That’s a No From Me: Menstrual Stigma in Carrie

Wearing Your Identity on Your Sleeve: Embodying Individuality with Tattoos

By Rachael Nuckles I’ve been fascinated with tattoos since middle school. Part of me has always felt inspired by tattooing, a process that allows a person to express themselves in a highly visible way. Depending on the placement, a tattoo can quite literally serve as a statement of one’s identity. The permanent artwork, phrase, or symbol placed on one’s body always has meaning, even if … Continue reading Wearing Your Identity on Your Sleeve: Embodying Individuality with Tattoos

Redefining Home

By Kathleen Quaintance “What makes a house a home? Unfortunately: revolution alone.” –Sophie Lewis Everyone of every gender recognizes “home.” Must we continue to conflate domesticity and womanhood? Because we need to redefine domesticity in order to separate it from outdated gendered boundaries, how might we engage in this redefinition?  I must first clarify the usage of the terms “domestic(ity). I am not referring to … Continue reading Redefining Home